Physical Education

http://wp.stolaf.edu/exercise-science/

Chair, 2008-09: Cynthia Book, senior seminar, activity classes, coaching volleyball

Faculty, 2008-09: Shahram Ahrar, coaching wrestling; Kurt Anderson, activity classes, coaching men’s and women’s soccer; John Bazzachini, coaching women’s hockey; Luke Benoit, coaching golf; John Campion, scuba; Traci Cook, coaching volleyball; Christine Daymont, activity classes, physiology of exercise, coaching women’s cross country, track and field; Jeremy Driver, coaching women’s soccer; Sean Goldsworthy, activity classes, biomechanics, coaching men’s hockey; Daniel Hagen, certified athletic trainer; David Hauck, coaching men’s swimming; Robert Hauck, nutrition, activity classes, coaching women’s swimming; John Kortuem, coaching diving; Dan Kosmoski, activity classes, coaching men’s basketball; Robert McCarthy, activity classes, coaching football, track and field; Matt McDonald, athletics director, activity classes, coaching baseball; Christopher Meidt, activity classes, coaching football; Scott Nesbit, activity classes, coaching men’s and women’s tennis; Ruth Neuger, coaching softball; Glen Peterson, coaching golf; Craig Stern, activity classes, coaching football; Judy Stromayer, activity classes, director of recreation; William Thornton, activity classes, coaching men’s cross country, track and field; Gary Wicks, motor learning, sport ethic in society

Exercise Science is the study of human movement, from its analysis to application in educational and sport settings. Its aim is the improvement of human performance and the enhancement of human development through the medium of physical activity throughout the lifespan. St. Olaf offers an exercise science major, a variety of activity courses to meet the core curriculum requirements for graduation, intramural and club sports, and 27 varsity sports.

GENERAL EDUCATION

Two different one-quarter (0.25) activity courses from the Departments of Exercise Science and/or Dance, or one one-half (.50) course from the Department of Exercise Science fulfill the physical activity requirement in the general education curriculum.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

The exercise science major at St. Olaf is designed for students interested in the advanced and specialized study of the biophysical aspects of exercise. The major supports academic linkages across the disciplines and provides excellent preparation in a wide variety of fields. It also prepares students for entry into graduate school in one of the disciplines related to exercise science (such as physical therapy and rehabilitation, biomechanics, nutrition, exercise physiology, sport medicine, chiropractics, cardiac rehabilitation). It is recommended that this major be complemented by other majors or concentrations of interest to the student; the Biomedical Studies Concentration may be of particular interest.

The required courses are Biology 125 and 243, Psychology 125, Nursing 110, and Physical Education 255, 290, 373, 374, 375, and 390. The department recommends Physical Education 394 and 398, Chemistry 121, Psychology 231 and completion of the biomedical concentration.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Biomedical Studies Concentration

The biomedical studies concentration consists of five courses and a senior capstone experience. All students must take a foundation course (Biology 123 or 243) depending on their course of study. In addition, students are required to choose one course from opportunities in each of three core components: 1) practical application; 2) experiential learning; and 3) ethical consideration. Within each of these three components there will be several choices to fulfill the requirement. Seminars and Interim courses may be included as they become available. See BIOMEDICAL STUDIES in this catalog for more details.

The Exercise Science Department offers the following courses that count toward the biomedical studies concentration: Exercise Science 255 (Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries), 373 (Motor Learning), 374 (Biomechanics), and 375 (Physiology of Exercise). Also, many experiential components that support the biomedical concentration (such as being a student athletic trainer or interning at a sport medicine clinic) exist within the Exercise Science Department.

Coaching Sequence

It is highly recommended that students in all teaching majors who wish to be employed as a head varsity coach of an interscholastic sport in a senior high school successfully complete the following sequence of courses: Exercise Science 238, 255, 335, 374, and 375. Students not in the education teaching track are encouraged to enter the program if they are interested in becoming an assistant or head coach. A coaching sequence candidate must make application for acceptance to the program with the Exercise Science Department (coaching sequence advisor).

COURSES

PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES (PHA)/ GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

The following courses fulfill the Physical Activities Requirement (PHA) or Studies in PHysical Motion (SPM). See also Dance Department. All .25 activities are repeatable, up to four times, but only after the Studies in Physical Movement Requirement (SPM) has been completed..

101 Archery (0.25)

Beginning level archers learn shooting skills. Students have opportunities for shooting both recurve and compound bows.

103 Golf (0.25)

This course presents an introduction/review of beginning golf skills, rules, and strategies. The course is not intended for the experienced golfer. Equipment available. Lab fee.

106 Rock Climbing (0.25)

Students learn basic rock climbing skills, techniques, and safety procedures.

108 In-Lline Skating (0.25)

Students learn basic skills and techniques of in-line skating. Equipment is required for participation.

109 Orienteering (0.25)

Students apply basic skills in compass and map reading. Orienteering has been called the thinking person’s sport because the participant must be mentally ready to read a map and use a compass and physically able to run the course.

111 Basketball (0.25)

This course offers an introduction/review of fundamental skills, rules, and drills. Students focus on basic strategy in games playing.

115 Volleyball (0.25)

This course offers an introduction/review of fundamental skills and rules of volleyball. Students focus on basic strategy in games playing.

117 Ultimate Frisbee™ (0.25)

Students learn the fundamental skills, rules, techniques, and strategies associated with the sport of Ultimate Frisbee.™

121 Beginning Swimming (0.25)

This course is for the non-swimming and the novice swimmer only.

122 Lifeguard Training (0.25)

Current first aid/CPR certification is necessary to qualify for Red Cross certification to lifeguard. Prerequisite: Exercise Science 121 or 130.

123 Water Safety Instruction (0.25)

Current first aid/CPR certification is necessary to qualify for Red Cross certification in W.S.I. Prerequisite: Exercise Science 121 or 130.

125 Canoeing (0.25)

This course offers instruction in and practice of the basic techniques of canoeing; safety in handling the canoe. Prerequisite: ability to swim. Lab fee.

126 Scuba (0.25)

This course offers instruction in all skills and techniques necessary to obtain PADI Open Water certification. Lab fee includes use of equipment.

128 Fly-Fishing/Fly-Tying (0.25)

This course introduces students to the lifetime sport of fly-fishing and fly-tying. Equipment available. Lab fee.

130 Swim Fitness (0.25)

This is an aerobic-based course utilizing swimming and water exercises. Prerequisite: Be able to swim 300 yards.

131 Aerobics (0.25)

Students learn and apply the basic principles of fitness through a variety of aerobic activities.

133 Individual Fitness (0.5)

Students personally apply the basic principles of exercise through conditioning, strength development, endurance training, and aerobic activities. Students participate in a wide range of assessments designed to enhance physical fitness.

134 Nordic Ski/Bike/Run (0.5)

This is an aerobic-based course utilizing instruction and participation in Nordic skiing, bicycling, and running. Equipment is required for participation. Students participate in a wide range of assessments designed to enhance physical fitness (strength, power, endurance, nutrition, flexibility, body composition, stress).

135 Jogging/Running (0.25)

This is an aerobic-based course utilizing instruction and participation in running and jogging to enhance personal fitness and training knowledge.

136 Fitness Walking (0.25)

This is an aerobic-based course utilizing instruction and participation in walking to enhance personal fitness and training knowledge.

140 Weight Training: Co-Ed (0.5)

Students learn the principles, techniques and safety aspects of weight-training and implement a personal training plan. Students participate in a wide range of assessments (strength, power, endurance, nutrition, flexibility, body composition, stress).

141 Weight Training: Men (0.25)

Students learn the principles of training, basic techniques, and safety procedures. Students develop and implement a personal training plan during the course.

142 Weight Training: Women (0.25)

Students learn the principles of training, basic techniques, and safety procedures. Students develop and implement a personal training plan during the course.

150 Racquet Sports (0.5)

This course offers instruction in basic strokes, history, rules, etiquette, and terminology of racquet sports (tennis, racquetball, badminton, pickleball, table tennis). Students participate in a wide range of assessments designed to enhance physical fitness (strength, endurance, nutrition, flexibility, body composition, stress).

151 Badminton (0.25)

This course offers instruction/review of fundamental skills, rules, and etiquette of badminton. Students focus on basic strategy in games playing.

153 Racquetball (0.25)

This course offers instruction/review of fundamental skills and rules of racquetball. Students focus on basic strategy in games playing.

157 Tennis (0.25)

This course offers instruction/review of basic strokes, history, rules, etiquette, and terminology of tennis. Students learn basic competition strategies in singles and doubles match play.

158 Intermediate Tennis (0.25)

This course is for students who can already serve, score, play the net, and know basic singles and doubles strategy. Prerequisite: Exercise Science 157, or permission of instructor.

161 Self-Defense (0.25)

Students learn a variety of practical measures to repel a physical attack, basic throws, kicks, falls, submission holds, and choke releases.

170-194 Intercollegiate Athletics (0.25)

Students competing in intercollegiate athletics may use the season of participation in a varsity sport for

0.25 course credit in Exercise Science. Only one 0.25 intercollegiate Exercise Science credit can be applied toward the two 0.25 course Physical Activity (PHA) graduation requirement. In addition, an intercollegiate physcial education (0.25) credit cannot be used as an elective for the purpose of earning a credit toward the 35 full course credits requirement for graduation. It can only be used once as one-half of the two-course PHA requirement. (See page 22-23 for more on PHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSES and page 35 for information on REPEATING A COURSE.) Fall Semester: varsity football, soccer, cross-country, women’s volleyball. Spring Semester: remainder of intercollegiate sports. Participants in club sports are not eligible. Students must register for the course during the competitive season.

PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM

238 Introduction to Coaching (0.5)

This course introduces students to the areas of sport psychology, sport administration, sport physiology, and sport pedagogy and serves as a foundation to the series of courses required for coaching certification. Successful completion of the course may include certification in the American Sport Education Program (ASEP).

255 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries

Students study principles pertinent to prevention of injuries in sports and Exercise Science; treatment and care of minor injuries. The course utilizes both lecture and laboratory.

290 Sport Ethic in Society

Students will examine the conceptual framework for ethical decision making using sports as a prism to examine normative perspectives. Varied ethical perspectives are analyzed through the conflicts presented in sports-related questions. Course readings and lectures examine the theoretical constructs of ethical decision making from Christian and non-Christian positions.

294 Internship

298 Independent Study

335 Coaching Practicum (0.25)

The course involves practice and game observation and a practicum in coaching a sport. Students are involved in practice planning and drill work, game preparation, and administration, as well as game rules and coaching strategies. This course applies toward the coaching sequence only. Prerequisites: Exercise Science 238 and permission of instructor.

373 Motor Learning

This course offers a basic study in motor skill acquisition and motor control. Topics include methods of assessment, evaluation, and research in the areas of motor learning and control, the learning environment, and discussion of factors that influence the acquisition and performance of motor skills. Prerequisite: Psychology 121.

374 Biomechanics

Students analyze mechanical principles in depth as they affect human motion. Topics include study of muscular and skeletal systems, skill analysis, and motion measurement techniques. The course included a laboratory component. Prerequisite: Biology 123 or consent of instructor.

375 Physiology of Exercise

Students study in-depth the physiology of exercise, covering cardiovascular and muscular adaptations to exercise and factors affecting performance, including body composition, environmental influences, training implications across gender and age, and the assessment of fitness. The course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisites: junior standing and Biology 123, or consent of instructor.

390 Exercise Science Seminar

The prerequisite for this class is the completion of the requirements in the exercise science major. Students may be co-registered for the capstone course and their final core course in the major. Presentations by the faculty of the Department of Exercise Science and other experts build upon material presented in the introductory and core courses and introduce students to advanced topics in exercise science. Students conduct semester-long research on a topic and present their findings in the form of a research paper.

394 Internship

398 Independent Research